How Can Black People Trust Anyone?

So, I’m going to get straight to the point, son. After the preposterous Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, I want everyone reading this to ask themselves a serious question: how are minorities really supposed to trust White people? Look, I know a number of our White counterparts like to believe they’re allies, but look at all of this from our perspective. All I can say is, at the end of the day, rallies like this prove that it’s impossible for us to decipher who’s really on our side.

Now, before I continue, I’d like to tell everyone a true story about myself. So, during my high school years, I went to a boarding school called the Taft School. Moving on, there was a White guy I was down with for most of my four years there. Keeping it a buck, I really thought this dude was one of my closest friends. For obvious reasons, I’ll keep his name to myself.

In any case, the second semester of our senior year rolled around and we started to get our college letters. Now, him and I both applied to Tufts University. Needless to say, I got in and he didn’t. Anyway, I happened to be walking behind him one day and I heard him tell another White kid that I only got in because of affirmative action. Keep in mind, I had a higher GPA than him, got a better SAT score, was involved in more extracurricular activities and played the same amount of sports. To be real, I was crushed, man.

Look, I was never one to be naive about racism, son. However; at 17 years old, I just wanted to believe that “not everyone was like that.” But, being honest, what was I supposed to think after that? In my head, if a White person I was cool with looked at me that way, then how does the rest of their community view me? All I know is, that particular incident completely changed the way I interact with White people. It’s sad to say, but even in the friendships I have now, a small part of me is always waiting for the other shoe to drop.

With all of that being said, let’s bring it back to Charlottesville. Now, folks would like us to believe that all of the protesting bigots are just poor and uneducated White people. In reality, these are people who are a part of every industry. These are people who I work with on a daily basis. These are people who are in positions of power and influence. Ultimately, that’s my point, man. As minorities, we never really know who we’re interacting with. Shit, we think people are cool until they show their true colors. By and by, that’s all Charlottesville was/is: racists feeling free enough to actually exposes themselves.

In the end, I don’t know what else to say here. Frankly, I don’t think anyone can blame minorities for being distrustful of the White majority. Listen, every time we think we have an ally, they flip the script on us. Hell, I know this from personal experience, son. All in all, these are the times when racism feels like a never-ending problem in America. *Sigh* That’s all I’ve got for today, man. LC out.

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Long Live Melodesiac!

So, as I’ve stated numerous times on this blog, I’m a musician first. To be more specific, I’m a rapper, singer, producer, engineer, keyboardist, guitarist and bassist. With all of that being said, I was only a rapper, singer and quasi-keyboardist when I was in Melodesiac. Now, for those who are unaware, Melodesiac was a band I was in during my college years. Side bar, big up to Tufts University. In any case, after realizing we put out our one and only album ten years ago this month, I wanted to give my brothers some shine.

To begin, it’s no exaggeration when I say this band taught me everything I know. Yeah, I’ve recorded plenty of songs before joining this group, but my real musical education came from being around my comrades. I learned how to write songs in this band. I learned how to play instruments in this band. I learned how to perform in this band. All jokes aside, if anyone digs any of the music I ever put out, they should thank this band. On the real, being in this group let me know that a musical act could be successful without compromising. We built a nice following by just being ourselves. We never adhered to any style or genre and we loved every minute of it.

Ultimately, we couldn’t keep it together because the members wanted to go in different directions. Keeping it a buck, the dissolution of the band hurt me. I didn’t record another song for three years after we parted ways in 2008. In any case, despite the raw emotion at the time, it was still a dope ass ride, man. So, in honor of my bredren, I’m going to post a couple of videos from our concert days. Also, for some reason, our album, Hands High, is still for sale on Amazon. Anyway, massive shout-out to Robert Brentley, Shahan Nercessian, Nehemiah Green, Ben Bornstein, Aaron Mehta, Arlen Spiro, James Harris, Yoni Dvorkis and Nick Ojeda. Long live Melodesiac!

P.S. Hey, fellas, we still have a whole unreleased album that our fans don’t know about. What should we do about that? Just saying… That is all.