Jay-Z Washed Jay Electronica On His Own Album

So, I won’t lie, son. On the real, I haven’t written a lot in the last week because of the fallout from the coronavirus. I mean, I’ve been working from home, my kids ain’t got no school and I’ve been grocery shopping in order to combat all of the people who are panic-buying toilet paper. All in all, shit is wild out here, man. But, through all of the shenanigans, I did get a chance to listen to Jay Electronica‘s debut album, A Written Testimony. The way I see it, Jay-Z washes him on damn near every song, fam.

Ok, for those who missed it, after about a decade of delays, Jay Elec FINALLY released an album, bruh. Now, if I’m being honest, NOTHING about this project is what I expected, son. First, on a 10-song project, Hov is on eight of the records. All I know is, that’s fucking weird for a debut album, man. Side note, I know that Ghostface Killah is on almost every record on Raekwon‘s debut album, but they still had previous Wu-Tang albums to introduce them, fam. In any case, not only is Hov prominently featured on the project, his voice is actually the first one we hear, folks. Frankly, all of this shit is strange, brethren.

Next, from a production aspect, Just Blaze is nowhere to be found on this album. Meaning, the mastermind behind “Exhibit A” and “Exhibit C” is not involved with the construction of this project. Furthermore, Jay Elec himself produces six out of the 10 songs. Now, his beats aren’t wack, but he could’ve gotten some harder shit to rock on, son. Like, he manages to recruit Swizz Beatz, Hit-Boy, AraabMuzik, The Alchemist and No I.D. for some tracks, but that only covers three of the songs, man. The truth is, the production is a little underwhelming, fam.

Now, to the matter at hand, bruh. *Sigh* For someone with Jay Elec’s lyrical ability, Hov cleans him up on pretty much every song. Shit, starting with “Ghost of Soulja Slim,” Hov isn’t playing with Jay Elec, son. I guess it’s a testament to his respect for Jay Elec’s pen, because Hov brings his A-game, man. Keeping it a buck, Hov’s verses on this album make me want another Jay-Z project, fam. Hell, him and No I.D. need to reconnect and do a follow-up to 4:44, people.

In the end, it might not seem like it from this post, but I actually like A Written Testimony, bruh. Real talk, a rapper of Jay Electronica’s caliber isn’t capable of making “wack” music, folks. Ultimately, after such a loooooong delay, I just wanted more, son. By and by, I wanted better beats and I wanted MORE Jay Elec. At the end of the day, he better not disappear again after this. In my eyes, he owes fans (like me) a lot more, man. *Sigh* Maybe next time we’ll actually get a Jay Electronica album, fam. Here’s to wishing, though. That is all. LC out.

This New Nas Song Ain’t It, Chief

So, anyone who knows me knows that I’m an unabashed Nas fan. Like, I legitimately believe he’s incapable of spitting a wack verse. Side bar, if given the chance, I’d even argue with Jay-Z about Nas’ “Oochie Wally” verse. Now, was that Nas’ finest moment? No, but those bars weren’t straight trash, son. In any case, lyrics were never Nas’ problem, man. On the real, his beat selection has always been suspect as fuck. With that being said, the trend (sadly) continues on the first single for this The Lost Tapes II album.

Ok, for those who are unaware, Nas is releasing a follow-up to his classic compilation album. Now, the original The Lost Tapes featured a bunch of songs that were supposed to be on I Am… and Stillmatic. However, thanks to early internet bootlegging, those songs didn’t make it out in their initial forms. Anyway, when that record came out in 2002, I was fucking HYPED, fam. Seriously, that album has some of my favorite Nas tracks, like “Blaze a 50,” “Everybody’s Crazy” and “Poppa Was a Playa.” Needless to say, when Nas teased a follow-up, I was ready to go, bruh.

Now, it finally seems like he’s ready to drop the record, son. So, as a warmup for the audience, Nas put out “Jarreau of Rap (Skatt Attack).” The song features the legendary Al Jarreau and showcases Nas’ lyrical dexterity. The problem is, the beat fucking sucks, man. Like, it REALLY sucks, fam. On top of that, the hook is super weird and wastes the Jarreau feature. All in all, this is not what I wanted to hear from this album, bruh. Shit, when a project lists Swizz BeatzPharrellRZAPete Rock and Kanye West as some of the producers, this ain’t the vibe I’m looking for, brethren. Frankly, I want to know who sanctioned this shit, folks.

Listen, Nas’ ear for beats has always been his Achilles Heel, son. The truth is, he’s always made his best albums when a notable figure gave him guidance. For example, MC Serch and Large Professor were the glue for IllmaticTrackmasters were the glue for It Was Written. Large Professor returned for StillmaticNo I.D. was the glue for Life Is Good. The way I see it, I don’t know if I can trust a Nas album when he’s left to his own devices, man. Keeping it a buck, I wish he would get Rick Ross to pick his beats. Hell, that might end up being one of the best albums ever, fam.

In the end, Nas will always be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Ultimately, I can’t take anything away from his ability to put words together. However, I was seriously unimpressed with this first single, bruh. By and by, I hope this isn’t a reflection of the whole album, son. If it is, it may have to be a hard pass for me, man. At the end of the day, that would hurt my rapper heart, fam. That is all. LC out.