Joe Budden For The Win!

So, it’s no secret that I’m a Joe Budden fan, son. I mean, I’ve already written about that on this very site, man. Shit, even before The Joe Budden Podcast with Rory and Mal, I was there for his debut album and entire Mood Muzik series. In any case, after all of these years, it’s super dope to see what he’s been able to accomplish with his podcast, fam. As of right now, I just hope that his new deal with Spotify works out for the best. All I know is, Budden might have the best rebrand in history, bruh.

Ok, for those who missed it, Budden just announced that he teamed up with Spotify to distribute his podcast. Now, according to the details, the show will be released exclusively through the streaming site, but will remain free for the listeners. Furthermore, Budden will now release two episodes per week, but still update his YouTube channel with content. Lastly, all of these changes will take place in September.

Keeping it a buck, I don’t know what else to say, son. Hell, this is just a dope ass move for Budden, Rory and Mal. Listen, I’ve been tuned into the podcast from the beginning (word to Marisa Mendez). So, I’ve seen the show through all of its incarnations, man. On the real, Budden’s podcast and The Joe Rogan Experience are my favorite joints to listen to, fam. With that being said, it’s about damn time that Budden and company got some recognition, bruh.

In the end, shout-out to Joe Budden for staying the course, son. Ultimately, he’s done AND been through a lot of bullshit along the way. Needless to say, he’s found a way to make it all work in the end. Shit, the New York Times just likened him to Howard Stern, but it wasn’t necessary, man. At the end of the day, Budden’s crazy ass is finally getting acknowledgement for being himself. That is all. LC out.

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How Does Spotify Choose Who To Ban?

So, before I begin, let me make one thing clear: I am in no way caping for XXXTentacion or R. Kelly in this post. Frankly, if both of them got the Thanos Infinity Gauntlet treatment, I’d be perfectly fine with that. In any case, I’m only bringing them up because Spotify‘s new “Hate Content & Hateful Conduct” policy is a little weird, son. I mean, why were those two particular artists picked out? In addition, what does that mean for other similarly-accused artists? Lastly, will any of these changes actually stick?

Ok, for those who missed it, here’s what’s going on. So, based on their new policy, Spotify is removing the music of R. Kelly and XXXTentacion from their playlists. Now, their songs will still be available on the streaming service, but they won’t be visibly promoted. Apparently, this is a way for them to choose who they support, based on their “values.”

Now, in theory, I see what Spotify is trying to do here. Look, both XXXTentacion and Kelly have been accused of some heinous deeds, man. Shit, XXXTentacion has had a myriad of legal issues, including the alleged assault of a pregnant woman. In addition, we ALL know what Kelly has been accused of, fam. Now, here’s my thing: why were these two artists selected? Hell, if we’re being real here, A TON of musicians have been accused of some dastardly shit, bruh. So, where do we draw the line exactly? Is Spotify going to remove EVERY artist that’s been accused of something? If so, it’s going to be SUPER quiet for all of their playlists, son. Keeping it a buck, a lot of these musicians are just terrible people, folks.

Side note, can Black people NOT pull the race card in this circumstance? On the real, I HATE when our community does that, man. Look, I just saw Akademiks try that shit on social media. Listen, can we not use racism as a way to protect abusers, rapists and murderers? Ok, yes, I know there’s a double standard when it comes to justice. However, I’m not about to march or take a stand for a certified dirtbag, fam. It just is what it is, bruh.

In the end, I’m just trying to understand what the end game is, son. Ultimately, Spotify has to come up with a clear methodology on how to choose who to ban, man. Also, I wonder if they can even maintain this initiative long-term. By and by, I’m not necessarily mad at them for removing XXXTentacion and R. Kelly. At the end of the day, I just want to know how far they’ll try to take this and if it’ll actually work. That is all. LC out.

My Brief Review Of J. Cole’s ‘KOD’

So, I’m going to TRY and keep today’s post short, son. I mean, at the end of the day, music is subjective, man. Frankly, I don’t believe in the idea of an album review influencing anyone’s opinion. Ok, yes, I’m well aware of the fact that this makes me sound like a complete hypocrite, fam. Shit, I’ve talked about a number of albums on this very site, bruh. But, I never said that I always make sense, folks. Anyway, let me cut the tomfoolery and give my brief review of J. Cole‘s KOD album.

Ok, I’m going to be real, son. I feel like this album is the tale of two halves. Look, in my opinion, the second half of the record is MUCH better than the first, man. The way I see it, the more meaningful songs surface towards the end of the album. Now, while songs like “KOD” and “ATM” have the right bop, the project goes up a level when “Brackets” comes on. Real talk, I feel like he properly expresses his overall message in “Brackets,” “Once an Addict,” “Friends,” “Window Pain” and “1985.”

Now, let me take a step back for a second, fam. So, for those who are unaware, Cole has a couple of visions for this album. In any case, the “KOD” acronym stands for “Kids on Drugs,” “King Overdose” and “Kill Our Demons.” As expected, the “Kids on Drugs” portion speaks about the prevalence of drug abuse in today’s youth culture. The “King Overdose” portion speaks about his own battles with addiction and escapism. Lastly, the “Kill Our Demons” portion speaks about our overall need to break free of the perils that shackle us. With all of that being said, I feel like he does a better job of touching all of those bases in the last five songs.

For example, he very eloquently depicts his mother’s struggles on “Once an Addict.” In addition, he’s able to address the general fuckery of our youth on “1985.” Side note, I think it’s amazing that clowns like Lil Pump and Smokepurpp are in their feelings about this song. Listen, Pump LITERALLY has a song called “Fuck J. Cole,” but he’s upset that he got a response? Bruh, get these little dudes the fuck from ’round me, son. In any case, Cole is able to get more thoughts across on the latter half of the album, man.

Moving on, another issue I have with the album is the production, fam. Now, Cole has never been a bad producer, bruh. However, at this point in his career, I feel like I’ve heard every type of beat he’s capable of making. Keeping it a buck, I’ve always wondered what a Cole project would sound like if he let someone else produce it. Hell, take a look at what No I.D. was able to do for Jay-Z on 4:44. Based on old interviews, Cole apparently has a great relationship with No I.D. Son, I could only imagine what an entire album would sound like if these two collaborated, man. *Sigh* I guess that’s just wishful thinking, fam. Regardless, he’s winning the way he’s doing it. So, who am I to criticize?

In the end, I think the album is just okay. I don’t think it’s wack, but I also don’t think it’s the best he can do. Ultimately, he doesn’t need to listen to any of the shit I’ve just said, bruh. I mean, he’s out here breaking streaming records on Apple Music and Spotify, son. By and by, J. Cole is prospering by being J. Cole. At the end of the day, I’m just speaking as a fan who would like to see more, man. That is all. LC out.

RIP Combat Jack

So, for those who don’t know, I’m a big podcast guy, son. Like, for someone who’s a musician, I spend waaay more time listening to podcasts, man. In any case, out of all of the podcasts in the known universe, the Combat Jack Show is always one of my go-to listens. With that being said, I’m sad to hear about the death of Reggie Ossé aka Combat Jack. Now, while I was aware of his cancer diagnosis, I didn’t expect him to go so soon, fam. All in all, Rest In Peace to one of Hip Hop‘s podcast pioneers, bruh.

Ok, back in October, Jack came out of the blue and told the world that he was recovering from colon cancer surgery. At the time, that news was shocking because us fans didn’t know he was sick. Anyway, in my eyes, even though I’ve personally seen the affects of cancer on loved ones, I thought Jack was going to be alright. Now, my sentiments were mainly based on Jack’s own demeanor. I mean, even though he knew he was in a precarious position, he still had a good attitude about everything. Real talk, he refused to let the cancer dim his light, son. All I know is, his outward composure was commendable as fuck, man.

Moving on, although Jack is now gone, his influence can’t be denied, fam. Listen, outside of his history as a prominent lawyer in Hip Hop, he founded one of the culture’s most recognizable podcast brands, fam. Hell, as of right now, who isn’t on the Loud Speakers Network, bruh? Currently, they have The Read with Kid Fury and Crissle, The Brilliant Idiots with Charlamagne Tha God and Andrew Schulz, Lip Service with Angela Yee and many more. In addition, they also had Tax Season with Taxstone before his unfortunate legal situation. Now, when I add on Mogul, his Chris Lighty documentary on Spotify, it’s clear that this man had a MAJOR impact on the zeitgeist, son.

In the end, shout-out to Mr. Ossé for everything he’s accomplished, man. Ultimately, I hope he realized his impact while he was here, fam. By and by, he was a real torchbearer for Hip Hop and that should never be forgotten. Once again, RIP to Combat Jack. LC out.