This New Nas Song Ain’t It, Chief

So, anyone who knows me knows that I’m an unabashed Nas fan. Like, I legitimately believe he’s incapable of spitting a wack verse. Side bar, if given the chance, I’d even argue with Jay-Z about Nas’ “Oochie Wally” verse. Now, was that Nas’ finest moment? No, but those bars weren’t straight trash, son. In any case, lyrics were never Nas’ problem, man. On the real, his beat selection has always been suspect as fuck. With that being said, the trend (sadly) continues on the first single for this The Lost Tapes II album.

Ok, for those who are unaware, Nas is releasing a follow-up to his classic compilation album. Now, the original The Lost Tapes featured a bunch of songs that were supposed to be on I Am… and Stillmatic. However, thanks to early internet bootlegging, those songs didn’t make it out in their initial forms. Anyway, when that record came out in 2002, I was fucking HYPED, fam. Seriously, that album has some of my favorite Nas tracks, like “Blaze a 50,” “Everybody’s Crazy” and “Poppa Was a Playa.” Needless to say, when Nas teased a follow-up, I was ready to go, bruh.

Now, it finally seems like he’s ready to drop the record, son. So, as a warmup for the audience, Nas put out “Jarreau of Rap (Skatt Attack).” The song features the legendary Al Jarreau and showcases Nas’ lyrical dexterity. The problem is, the beat fucking sucks, man. Like, it REALLY sucks, fam. On top of that, the hook is super weird and wastes the Jarreau feature. All in all, this is not what I wanted to hear from this album, bruh. Shit, when a project lists Swizz BeatzPharrellRZAPete Rock and Kanye West as some of the producers, this ain’t the vibe I’m looking for, brethren. Frankly, I want to know who sanctioned this shit, folks.

Listen, Nas’ ear for beats has always been his Achilles Heel, son. The truth is, he’s always made his best albums when a notable figure gave him guidance. For example, MC Serch and Large Professor were the glue for IllmaticTrackmasters were the glue for It Was Written. Large Professor returned for StillmaticNo I.D. was the glue for Life Is Good. The way I see it, I don’t know if I can trust a Nas album when he’s left to his own devices, man. Keeping it a buck, I wish he would get Rick Ross to pick his beats. Hell, that might end up being one of the best albums ever, fam.

In the end, Nas will always be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Ultimately, I can’t take anything away from his ability to put words together. However, I was seriously unimpressed with this first single, bruh. By and by, I hope this isn’t a reflection of the whole album, son. If it is, it may have to be a hard pass for me, man. At the end of the day, that would hurt my rapper heart, fam. That is all. LC out.

My Brief Review Of J. Cole’s ‘KOD’

So, I’m going to TRY and keep today’s post short, son. I mean, at the end of the day, music is subjective, man. Frankly, I don’t believe in the idea of an album review influencing anyone’s opinion. Ok, yes, I’m well aware of the fact that this makes me sound like a complete hypocrite, fam. Shit, I’ve talked about a number of albums on this very site, bruh. But, I never said that I always make sense, folks. Anyway, let me cut the tomfoolery and give my brief review of J. Cole‘s KOD album.

Ok, I’m going to be real, son. I feel like this album is the tale of two halves. Look, in my opinion, the second half of the record is MUCH better than the first, man. The way I see it, the more meaningful songs surface towards the end of the album. Now, while songs like “KOD” and “ATM” have the right bop, the project goes up a level when “Brackets” comes on. Real talk, I feel like he properly expresses his overall message in “Brackets,” “Once an Addict,” “Friends,” “Window Pain” and “1985.”

Now, let me take a step back for a second, fam. So, for those who are unaware, Cole has a couple of visions for this album. In any case, the “KOD” acronym stands for “Kids on Drugs,” “King Overdose” and “Kill Our Demons.” As expected, the “Kids on Drugs” portion speaks about the prevalence of drug abuse in today’s youth culture. The “King Overdose” portion speaks about his own battles with addiction and escapism. Lastly, the “Kill Our Demons” portion speaks about our overall need to break free of the perils that shackle us. With all of that being said, I feel like he does a better job of touching all of those bases in the last five songs.

For example, he very eloquently depicts his mother’s struggles on “Once an Addict.” In addition, he’s able to address the general fuckery of our youth on “1985.” Side note, I think it’s amazing that clowns like Lil Pump and Smokepurpp are in their feelings about this song. Listen, Pump LITERALLY has a song called “Fuck J. Cole,” but he’s upset that he got a response? Bruh, get these little dudes the fuck from ’round me, son. In any case, Cole is able to get more thoughts across on the latter half of the album, man.

Moving on, another issue I have with the album is the production, fam. Now, Cole has never been a bad producer, bruh. However, at this point in his career, I feel like I’ve heard every type of beat he’s capable of making. Keeping it a buck, I’ve always wondered what a Cole project would sound like if he let someone else produce it. Hell, take a look at what No I.D. was able to do for Jay-Z on 4:44. Based on old interviews, Cole apparently has a great relationship with No I.D. Son, I could only imagine what an entire album would sound like if these two collaborated, man. *Sigh* I guess that’s just wishful thinking, fam. Regardless, he’s winning the way he’s doing it. So, who am I to criticize?

In the end, I think the album is just okay. I don’t think it’s wack, but I also don’t think it’s the best he can do. Ultimately, he doesn’t need to listen to any of the shit I’ve just said, bruh. I mean, he’s out here breaking streaming records on Apple Music and Spotify, son. By and by, J. Cole is prospering by being J. Cole. At the end of the day, I’m just speaking as a fan who would like to see more, man. That is all. LC out.

Jay-Z Made A ‘Grown A*s Man’ Album

So, I’ll admit, there are certain times when I’m happy to be wrong. As everyone may recall, just last week, I questioned whether we needed a new Jay-Z album. In my defense, it wasn’t because I’m not a Hov fan. In fact, I’m an obnoxiously HUGE Hov fan. Ultimately, I didn’t want him to drop some subpar shit, fam. Thankfully, 4:44 is fucking DOPE, man! On the real, Jigga made a “grown ass man” album. Whether he’s speaking about infidelity, finances or social issues, he’s poignantly discussing a variety of topics. All in all, good shit, Jay!

First, let me begin by talking about No I.D. Now, I did call this shit, son. Listen, Dion just doesn’t make wack beats, fam. Like, I actually believe he’s incapable of making questionable shit. I mean, he’s been in the game for over 20 years and he’s never released any trash. Look, even Bow Wow‘s “Let Me Hold You” knocks, man! In any case, No I.D. successfully bridges different eras in his beats. He’s able to remain true to his sampling roots, while programming his drums to fit into today’s musical climate. By and by, the sonics of this album are immaculate, son!

Next, let’s talk about Hov. Ok, yes, he finally addresses the cheating rumors. Wait, before I continue, was anyone actually confused by Beyoncé‘s Lemonade? Now, I thought she made it perfectly clear that Hov was sticking and moving around town. Frankly, I’m surprised by people being surprised on social media. Anyway, Jay drops all of the bombs in terms of his wayward behavior. In fact, at this point, the only thing we don’t know are the names of the outside chicks. Keeping it a buck, Hov gave us everything else, son. Shit, he even admits that his actions were the reason why Solange tried to go Liu Kang on him in that elevator.

Moving on, in addition to his Lemonade response, Hov also covers A TON of other subjects. He talks about financial literacy on “The Story of O.J.” He talks about supporting Diddy, another Black business owner, on “Family Feud.” He talks about accepting his mother’s sexuality on “Smile.” He even talks about Kanye West‘s fuckity-fuckery on “Kill Jay Z.” All I know is, it seems like Jay leaves no stone unturned on this album, bruh. Regardless, I approve of all of it, fam.

In the end, this new album is light years ahead of his last two records. Ultimately, it’s good to see that he still has some tricks up his sleeve. Now, let me get back to my listening experience, son. I’ll catch everyone on the rebound. LC out.

P.S. Never go Eric Benét, son. Bruh, I laughed really hard at that line, man. My bad, Eric. I’m sure he’s out here just trying to keep it cool. However; he’ll never live down the Halle Berry tomfoolery, fam. That is all.

Should I Be Excited For A New Jay-Z Album?

Now, before I get started, let me make one thing clear: Jay-Z is the greatest rapper of all time. No, I will not debate this and I will not entertain any opinions to the contrary. Listen, the sky is blue, water is wet and Jigga is the G.O.A.T. It just is what it is, fam. With that being said, do we really need a new Hov album, bruh? Look, I may be speaking blasphemy, but I don’t know what to make of a 2017 Jay-Z album. Ultimately, I’m hoping it’s good, but I don’t want to set myself up for disappointment.

So, for me, the last great Hov album was American Gangster. In my eyes, it’s his best album after Reasonable Doubt and The Blueprint. Yeah, that’s right, I’m putting it ahead of The Black Album and Vol. 2… Hard Knock Life, son. I mean, the soulful production is perfect and his bars are immaculate, man. Fam, any emcee that can write a line like “surviving droughts, I wish you well” cannot be disrespected. In any case, that album represents Hov at the end of his prime. Now, while I enjoy a number of songs off of The Blueprint 3 and Magna Carta Holy Grail, those albums don’t hit me like Jigga at his best.

Keeping it a buck, when I first heard about Hov’s new album, I wasn’t excited. Well, not until I heard No I.D.‘s name. Apparently, the legendary Chicago producer is shepherding the entire record. Now, if that’s the case, I’ll definitely need to take a listen to the album. On the real, I don’t think No I.D. has ever missed, man. I mean, from his countless work with Common to Jay’s “D.O.A.,” he always drops fire, son. Hopefully, the same remains true for this new endeavor. While I wasn’t super geeked about the “Adnis” snippet, I’ll reserve judgement until I hear the entire song.

In the end, I just want the album to be good, man. Listen, Jay is by far my favorite rapper. I can’t have him looking super washed out here, son. All in all, I guess we’ll all see what’s really good on June 30th. Don’t let us down, Jay. LC out.

P.S. I know Hov owns Tidal, but damn, bruh! Can we chill with the streaming exclusives, fam? Look, none of us should have to pay for multiple platforms in order to hear our favorite artists. It’s fucking ridiculous, son. Ok, rant over. Peace.