So… Eminem Is Pissed, Huh?

So, let me begin this post by saying that Eminem is my number-three favorite rapper of all time. Side note, Jay-Z will always be number-one to me. Also, Kanye West is my number-two, but everyone knows how disappointed I am in him, son. With that being said, allow me to keep it a buck for a second, man. *Sigh* In my eyes, every Em album after The Eminem Show has been trash, fam. That’s right, I’m talking about Encore, Relapse, Recovery, The Marshall Mathers LP 2 AND Revival. I mean, Em will always be able to rap, but those albums just didn’t do it for me, bruh. All I know is, I’m not alone in this assessment. In any case, based on his surprise Kamikaze album, Em took the Revival criticism personally, folks.

Look, I’m going to be brief, son. Eminem disses EVERYBODY on Kamikaze! Like, EVERYBODY, man! Frankly, I don’t have the brain power to link every name to the specific song they’re mentioned in. All I can say is, there are a laundry list of digs on this record, fam. Shit, just off of memory, I remember hearing him diss Donald Trump, Drake, Charlamagne Tha God, Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, Tyler, the Creator, Earl Sweatshirt, Machine Gun Kelly, Lil Yachty, Lil Pump, Lil Xan and Lord Jamar. Hell, I know there’s more, but my brain can only hold so much information, bruh.

As it stands, most of these disses revolve around either hating Mumble Rap or hating anyone who didn’t like Revival. Listen, Em is my guy, but Revival was wack, son. Real talk, instead of dwelling on that, he should’ve just focused on his next effort. Then again, maybe he needed this kind of energy, man. On the real, this is the best Eminem album is years, fam. For whatever reason, an angry Em over Mike Will Made It and Boi-1da beats is a good thing, bruh. It forces Em to switch up the flow he’s been using for the last damn decade.

In the end, I’ll take it, son. Ultimately, this won’t go down as his best work, but it’s a welcome surprise to me, man. By and by, I wasn’t expecting anything from an Em album. At the end of the day, it’s good to hear him with some semblance of passion, fam. For the record, though, Revival still sucks, Em. Sorry not sorry. LC out.

P.S. It’s super weird that Em threw shots at Drake when “Not Alike” is a BLATANT rip-off of “Look Alive.” Listen, I know that Tay Keith produced both songs, but damn, son! At least TRY to hide the bite, man! Good day.

My Brief Review Of J. Cole’s ‘KOD’

So, I’m going to TRY and keep today’s post short, son. I mean, at the end of the day, music is subjective, man. Frankly, I don’t believe in the idea of an album review influencing anyone’s opinion. Ok, yes, I’m well aware of the fact that this makes me sound like a complete hypocrite, fam. Shit, I’ve talked about a number of albums on this very site, bruh. But, I never said that I always make sense, folks. Anyway, let me cut the tomfoolery and give my brief review of J. Cole‘s KOD album.

Ok, I’m going to be real, son. I feel like this album is the tale of two halves. Look, in my opinion, the second half of the record is MUCH better than the first, man. The way I see it, the more meaningful songs surface towards the end of the album. Now, while songs like “KOD” and “ATM” have the right bop, the project goes up a level when “Brackets” comes on. Real talk, I feel like he properly expresses his overall message in “Brackets,” “Once an Addict,” “Friends,” “Window Pain” and “1985.”

Now, let me take a step back for a second, fam. So, for those who are unaware, Cole has a couple of visions for this album. In any case, the “KOD” acronym stands for “Kids on Drugs,” “King Overdose” and “Kill Our Demons.” As expected, the “Kids on Drugs” portion speaks about the prevalence of drug abuse in today’s youth culture. The “King Overdose” portion speaks about his own battles with addiction and escapism. Lastly, the “Kill Our Demons” portion speaks about our overall need to break free of the perils that shackle us. With all of that being said, I feel like he does a better job of touching all of those bases in the last five songs.

For example, he very eloquently depicts his mother’s struggles on “Once an Addict.” In addition, he’s able to address the general fuckery of our youth on “1985.” Side note, I think it’s amazing that clowns like Lil Pump and Smokepurpp are in their feelings about this song. Listen, Pump LITERALLY has a song called “Fuck J. Cole,” but he’s upset that he got a response? Bruh, get these little dudes the fuck from ’round me, son. In any case, Cole is able to get more thoughts across on the latter half of the album, man.

Moving on, another issue I have with the album is the production, fam. Now, Cole has never been a bad producer, bruh. However, at this point in his career, I feel like I’ve heard every type of beat he’s capable of making. Keeping it a buck, I’ve always wondered what a Cole project would sound like if he let someone else produce it. Hell, take a look at what No I.D. was able to do for Jay-Z on 4:44. Based on old interviews, Cole apparently has a great relationship with No I.D. Son, I could only imagine what an entire album would sound like if these two collaborated, man. *Sigh* I guess that’s just wishful thinking, fam. Regardless, he’s winning the way he’s doing it. So, who am I to criticize?

In the end, I think the album is just okay. I don’t think it’s wack, but I also don’t think it’s the best he can do. Ultimately, he doesn’t need to listen to any of the shit I’ve just said, bruh. I mean, he’s out here breaking streaming records on Apple Music and Spotify, son. By and by, J. Cole is prospering by being J. Cole. At the end of the day, I’m just speaking as a fan who would like to see more, man. That is all. LC out.