The Brilliance Of Daniel Kaluuya & Lakeith Stanfield

Disclaimer: Spoooooilers!

So, like I always say, I’m going to try and keep this post short today. The fact of the matter is, Judas and the Black Messiah is a great fucking movie, son. All I know is, Daniel Kaluuya and Lakeith Stanfield took turns putting on acting clinics in this shit. Real talk, after watching the film, my wife and I debated who’s the real focus of the plot. I mean, it’s hard to look away from Fred Hampton, but William O’Neal‘s story is equally as compelling, man. In any case, I just want to give credit where credit is due, fam. Shaka King did the damn thing with this film, bruh.

Ok, for those who are unaware, Judas and the Black Messiah dropped last week on HBO Max and in select theaters. The film chronicles O’Neal’s troubles with the law and how the FBI, namely Roy Mitchell, use him to infiltrate and destabilize Hampton and the Chicago faction of the Black Panther Party. Thanks to O’Neal’s informant-ass ratting, the Bureau is able to not only lock Hampton up over some bullshit, but eventually plan his execution. All in all, O’Neal leaves a lot of devastation in his wake.

Now, I could go on and on about what I love about the film, but I’ll just leave everyone with three takeaways (two about the film and one about the real story). First, I’m amazed by Kaluuya’s ability to not only embody Hampton’s personality, but also his vocal inflections. Son, it’s absolutely spooky that he can be that accurate. Frankly, it’s always a good time when I forget the actor and become fully-immersed in the character. Second, Stanfield does a fantastic job of leaving me confused. On the real, I can’t reconcile whether O’Neal really believes in the work that he’s doing or if he’s just playing the snitch for survival. All I can say is, Stanfield does an incredible job of making O’Neal seem ambiguous. Regardless, fuck William O’Neal.

Moving on, my third point relates to the actual story. Keeping it a buck, the film just highlights something that I’ve always felt: J. Edgar Hoover fucking won, man. Thanks to COINTELPRO, he was able to destabilize every Black movement in America. From Hampton to Martin Luther King Jr. to Malcolm X to Huey Newton, Bobby Seale and Eldridge Cleaver, Hoover was able to successfully destroy all of these movements from the inside. His fear of a “Black messiah” inspired him to decimate any group that strived for Black upliftment. The way I see it, the FBI can try to rebrand all they want, but their story is rooted in the oppression of Black people. That’s just a fucking fact, fam.

In the end, everybody should go watch the movie, bruh. Ultimately, it’s masterfully done and the real tale is incredibly infuriating. By and by, Hampton was right, son. At the end of the day, they can murder a revolutionary, but they can’t murder revolution. Always remembers that. That is all. LC out.

How Economics Got Fred Hampton Killed

So, I won’t lie, son. On the real, I’ve been in a major Fred Hampton frame of mind lately. Now, as anyone could imagine, a lot of that has to do with the Judas and the Black Messiah movie that’s dropping this week. Despite my previous criticism of Daniel Kaluuya, his pedigree as an actor just can’t be questioned. With that being said, I’m positive that he’s going to do Hampton’s legacy justice. In any case, since Hampton’s name is back in the limelight, I’d like us all to really dive into his message. All in all, he was assassinated for one main reason: uniting various groups of disenfranchised people for economic empowerment.

Ok, for those who are unaware, outside of his leadership position in the Black Panther Party, the Rainbow Coalition was his next evolution. With this group, he was able to unite the Panthers, the Young Patriots Organization and the Young Lords for a common goal. Now, while it’s always easy to spot the differences between Black, White and Latino people, Hampton’s mission was to display our commonalities. When it came to institutions like poverty and housing, the affects were felt across a variety of communities. So, coming together to address these disparities was a sign of true revolution.

The truth is, the FBI and the rest of the federal government were well-aware of this, man. J. Edgar Hoover was especially fearful of a “Black messiah” that could galvanize the people. Shit, COINTELPRO was created for the sole purpose of destroying any movement designed to help Black America. Real talk, Black leaders were already considered “dangerous” for espousing beliefs of equality. However, they were ESPECIALLY feared when they turned their attention to economics and coalescing with outside groups.

Look, it’s not a coincidence that Hampton was killed 8 months after founding the Rainbow Coalition. I mean, the FBI had a file on him since 1967, but was murdered 2 years later when he started working with different racial and ethnic groups. Furthermore, it’s not a coincidence that Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated a month before the Poor People’s Campaign‘s march in Washington. Hell, everyone loves his “I Have A Dream” speech, but neglect to talk about his demand for wealth redistribution, equal housing and land rights. All I know is, when King and Hampton started turning their attention to the greater crimes of capitalism, they were removed from this Earth. The way I see it, none of that was by chance, man.

In this end, this is how it has always played out historically. Ultimately, Tulsa wasn’t destroyed because of Dick Rowland. It was destroyed because White people couldn’t stand the idea of financially-independent Black people. By and by, the evils of this country really rear their heads when the money is being affected. At the end of the day, slavery was about free labor for monetary gain. All I can say is, true liberation in this country comes from financial freedom. All of our heroes knew that and that’s a main cause for why they were murdered. That is all. LC out.

Randi B. & LC: Joe Biden, Beyoncé & Educating Non-Black Folk

What’s good, brethren? On this episode, Randi B. and I were back on Facebook Live talking about Joe Biden, Beyoncé‘s Black Is King and educating non-Black people about Black issues. It evolved into a conversation that included missing simple pleasures during quarantine and the upcoming Fred Hampton movie, Judas and the Black Messiah. Check it out on YouTube below. Let’s go!

‘The Photograph’: The Debate Over Michael & Mae

Disclaimer: I’m back with all of the spoilers, brethren. Proceed with caution.

So, over the weekend, my wife and I went to go see Stella Meghie’s The Photograph. In any case, despite the fact that the film doesn’t stray too far away from common romantic drama themes, I still enjoyed myself, son. Moving on, after we saw the movie, my wife came across a brief review by Demetria L. Lucas. All I can say is, I disagree with her assessment of the main characters’ relationship.

Ok, before I continue, let me give a quick synopsis of the plot. So, the film revolves around Michael Block and Mae Morton. Anyway, Michael is a writer for an online magazine and Mae is a curator at a museum. Now, they end up crossing paths because Michael is writing a piece on Christina Eames, a famous photographer who also happens to be Mae’s mother. The truth is, I could delve into the entire storyline, but I’m trying to get to the source of the conflict between Michael and Mae.

Now, in the midst of getting to know each other, Michael finds out that he secured a writing job with the Associated Press in London, England. From there, Michael expresses to Mae that he still wants to pursue a relationship with her, despite her New York living situation. Hurt by the news, Mae rejects Michael’s wish to continue and chooses to just enjoy their final moments together.

With all of that being said, let’s get back to Lucas’ point. Now, in her Instagram post, she expressed disappointment with the fact that Mae goes to see Michael in London (for a Kendrick Lamar concert). In her eyes, Michael should be the one to make a move for Mae. But, the last time I checked, Mae says that she doesn’t want to pursue anything further with Michael. Frankly, when Michael gets on the plane to London, he’s under the assumption that Mae doesn’t want him. So, why would he continue to chase her down?

Look, I’m old enough to have had a few laps around the block, man. On the real, I’ve heard multiple women complain about men who “didn’t get the hint.” Also, I’ve heard women lament about guys who “wouldn’t leave [them] alone” or kept “badgering [them].” The fact is, Michael is simply respecting Mae’s wishes. Now, if Mae has a change of heart, which she ultimately does, then it is on her to communicate this. Fam, we’re all adults here. If Mae wants Michael, then she should tell him that, which is what brings her to England. All in all, I believe this situation happens exactly the way that it should, bruh.

Anyway, while I’m here, I want to address some of the caping that I saw for Christina in Lucas’ comments. Son, a few of these ladies need to stop justifying her behavior. Shit, I saw one comment where a woman said that people keep talking about Christina’s “perceived failures” instead of her accolades. Perceived? Fam, Christina gets on a Greyhound bus, without telling her partner Issac Jefferson, while pregnant with his child and doesn’t tell him (or Mae) that Mae is his for the next 30 years. Furthermore, Christina doesn’t tell her daughter that she’s sick and ends up writing all of her feelings in a letter. Keep in mind, Christina never shares any of these observations with Mae during her life.

All I know is, Christina’s accomplishments don’t negate the fact that she treats people terribly. Look, she has every right to not want to live a “mediocre” life with Issac in Louisiana. Hell, she would’ve ended up resenting him if she stayed. However, she’s still in a union with Issac. As a grown-up, she’s obligated to tell him that she’s planning to leave. She’s obligated to tell him that he has a child. Son, she essentially left Mae with the responsibility of repairing the relationship with Issac. Keeping it a buck, those aren’t “perceived failures.” Those are glaring character flaws, man.

In the end, I’m not here to bash anyone, fam. Ultimately, I just always find it interesting how factions of people can look at the same situation in drastically different ways. By and by, I thought the movie was good, bruh. At the end of the day, I think I can add it to my “rewatch-ables” list. So, great job, Meghie. Great job. That is all. LC out.