RIP Chadwick Boseman

So, like I always say, I’m going to try to keep today’s post short, son. The fact of the matter is, Chadwick Boseman was/is a cotdamn legend and should be respected as much. Although his career didn’t reach 20 years, he was responsible for NUMEROUS legendary depictions of Black people. All in all, Boseman represented the best of us and should be celebrated for his accomplishments.

Ok, for those who are living under a rock, Boseman just passed away at the age of 43. Now, given how young he was, it would be a good guess to think that he succumbed to some random tragedy. However, the truth is a lot more painful, sad and miraculous. Apparently, Boseman had been battling colon cancer for four years. That’s right, the man who was responsible for making Black kids feel like superheroes was quietly fighting for his life.

Now, when I think about Boseman’s diagnosis, I have so many thoughts at once, man. First, the entire time that he was bringing Black Panther to life, he was secretly battling for survival. Shit, he literally had to get in the best shape of his life for that role. Fam, I can’t even imagine how difficult that was while simultaneously dealing with a cancer diagnosis. No pun intended, but that was REALLY fucking heroic, bruh.

In addition, Boseman’s death has me grappling with my own mortality. I mean, think about it, son. If he was dealing with cancer for four years, then that means he was diagnosed at 39 years old. Hell, I just turned 35 this month, man. The truth is, I’m not that far away from where Boseman was, fam. Frankly, I couldn’t even fathom being as strong as he was at such a young age.

In any case, it goes without saying that he’ll be best remembered for Black Panther. Look, when someone’s the star of a billion-dollar movie, their name becomes etched in stone. But, Boseman was also responsible for MULTIPLE roles that shed a positive light on the Black community. He played Jackie Robinson, the first Black man to break Major League Baseball‘s color barrier. He played Thurgood Marshall, the first Black man appointed to the Supreme Court. He played James Brown, the inventor of the Funk and one of the most influential musicians in human history. And of course, he played T’Challa, an African king and superhero that Black children everywhere could emulate. The fact of the matter is, Boseman displayed MANY facets of Black greatness and I thank him for it.

In the end, rest in peace to Chadwick Boseman. Ultimately, I was thoroughly shocked by this news, bruh. By and by, we NEVER know what someone is dealing with behind closed doors, son. At the end of the day, I applaud Boseman for his strength. He didn’t let his ailment stop him from becoming a legend. The way I see it, that’s a lesson that all of us can learn, man. That is all. LC out.

I Don’t Know What I’m Hearing On This Childish Gambino Album

So, I won’t lie, son. On the real, the title of this post is a bit misleading, man. I mean, on face value, it may seem as if I’m questioning Childish Gambino‘s direction on his 3.15.20 album. However, this entire article is about to be on some Stan shit, fam. All I know is, I have no fucking idea what I’m hearing on Donald Glover‘s new project. But, I can safely say that I love the shit out of it, bruh.

Ok, for those who missed it, Gambino just released his fourth album. Now, the manner in which this project was released has been true to form for Glover: weird. First, last Sunday (3/15/20 *hint hint*), Gambino uploaded the album to donaldgloverpresents.com. Anyway, for about 12 hours, the project was on a continuous loop on the website. After that period of time, the music was taken down and we were all left to wonder what the fuck just happened. Fast forward to last night, Gambino released the album, now titled 3.15.20, on all streaming platforms. Needless to say, I was fucking HYPED, son!

Now, in regards to the music, there’s nothing straightforward about this project, man. Like, the tracks can’t be confined to one genre and a number of them have multiple sections. All in all, there’s a high-level of musicianship running through this album, fam. From the guitars to the synths to the vocal harmonies, the songs have a lot of elements that are in my bag, bruh. On top of that, “Feels Like Summer,” which is now called “42.26,” is still my shit, son. The point is, I’m fucking happy to have my new coronavirus soundtrack, brethren.

In the end, there’s nothing else to say, son. Ultimately, everyone needs to go listen to the album, man. By and by, it might be a challenging listen for some people. But, as someone who worships Prince, I’m all about challenging listens, fam. Side note, I’m not comparing Gambino to Prince, but I applaud any artist who (successfully) takes risks. At the end of the day, I’ve never been disappointed by a Childish Gambino project (not even Camp). Today is not the day to start, folks. That is all. LC out.

P.S. Shout-out to DJ Dahi and Ludwig Göransson. All I can say is, they did their fucking thing on the production, son. Good day.

P.P.S. Here are some of my favorite tunes from the album. Ok, I’m really done now.

The Bruno Mars Hate Doesn’t Make Sense

So, let me get straight to the point, son. The hate that Bruno Mars is receiving right now is pure nonsense, man. In my eyes, calling Mars a “cultural appropriator” is inaccurate, fam. From my vantage point, there’s a difference between inspiration and theft. Now, are a lot of Mars’ musical sources identifiable? Absolutely. However; the style of damn near EVERY artist can be traced to some predecessor. With that being said, what’s the real fucking beef with Mars, bruh?

Ok, for those who missed it, let me explain how all of this began. Now, in a video for The Grapevine, writer Seren Sensei went on a tangent about her disdain for Mars. According to her, Mars borrows too much from Black artists and shouldn’t be allowed to get a pass since he isn’t Black. In addition, she believes that he “plays up” his racial ambiguity in order to pull the wool over our eyes. All in all, she went full Super Saiyan on him and I think it’s a bit misguided, son.

Now, to me, a cultural appropriator is someone who doesn’t recognize or admit where they got their style from. By that definition, Mars doesn’t fit the mold, man. Honestly, all that guy does is give credit to the artists who came before him. Real talk, just take a look at his “Album of the Year” speech for 24K Magic at the Grammys. Fam, he literally thanked Babyface, Teddy Riley and Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis for inspiring him! On top of that, during an interview with Latina, he went into great detail about how all American music has its roots in Black music. So, if he’s actually giving credit to his sources, what’s the fucking problem, bruh?! I mean, are Black people the only ones who are allowed to embrace the Funk?

Look, if anybody doesn’t like Mars’ songs, then just say that, son. On the real, people are 100% entitled to their personal tastes. However; criticizing him for being a cultural appropriator or a vulture is just foolish, man. Real talk, all that dude does is give credit to Black musicians and Black artistry. Shit, just look at his band, fam! It’s literally nothing but Black and Brown players! What the hell else do people want, bruh?! In my eyes, this entire debate is fucking stupid, folks. At the end of the day, baseless accusations and name-calling won’t stop me from enjoying his discography.

In the end, let’s just chill out with the tomfoolery, son. Ultimately, we all have a choice, man: we can either enjoy Mars’ music or not. However; no one should be judged for digging his songs. By and by, the man is inspired by Black music and makes no secret of it. So, if he’s actually tipping his hat to his musical forefathers, then no one out there has a credible beef, fam. That is all. LC out.

Long Live Melodesiac!

So, as I’ve stated numerous times on this blog, I’m a musician first. To be more specific, I’m a rapper, singer, producer, engineer, keyboardist, guitarist and bassist. With all of that being said, I was only a rapper, singer and quasi-keyboardist when I was in Melodesiac. Now, for those who are unaware, Melodesiac was a band I was in during my college years. Side bar, big up to Tufts University. In any case, after realizing we put out our one and only album ten years ago this month, I wanted to give my brothers some shine.

To begin, it’s no exaggeration when I say this band taught me everything I know. Yeah, I’ve recorded plenty of songs before joining this group, but my real musical education came from being around my comrades. I learned how to write songs in this band. I learned how to play instruments in this band. I learned how to perform in this band. All jokes aside, if anyone digs any of the music I ever put out, they should thank this band. On the real, being in this group let me know that a musical act could be successful without compromising. We built a nice following by just being ourselves. We never adhered to any style or genre and we loved every minute of it.

Ultimately, we couldn’t keep it together because the members wanted to go in different directions. Keeping it a buck, the dissolution of the band hurt me. I didn’t record another song for three years after we parted ways in 2008. In any case, despite the raw emotion at the time, it was still a dope ass ride, man. So, in honor of my bredren, I’m going to post a couple of videos from our concert days. Also, for some reason, our album, Hands High, is still for sale on Amazon. Anyway, massive shout-out to Robert Brentley, Shahan Nercessian, Nehemiah Green, Ben Bornstein, Aaron Mehta, Arlen Spiro, James Harris, Yoni Dvorkis and Nick Ojeda. Long live Melodesiac!

P.S. Hey, fellas, we still have a whole unreleased album that our fans don’t know about. What should we do about that? Just saying… That is all.