Jay-Z Washed Jay Electronica On His Own Album

So, I won’t lie, son. On the real, I haven’t written a lot in the last week because of the fallout from the coronavirus. I mean, I’ve been working from home, my kids ain’t got no school and I’ve been grocery shopping in order to combat all of the people who are panic-buying toilet paper. All in all, shit is wild out here, man. But, through all of the shenanigans, I did get a chance to listen to Jay Electronica‘s debut album, A Written Testimony. The way I see it, Jay-Z washes him on damn near every song, fam.

Ok, for those who missed it, after about a decade of delays, Jay Elec FINALLY released an album, bruh. Now, if I’m being honest, NOTHING about this project is what I expected, son. First, on a 10-song project, Hov is on eight of the records. All I know is, that’s fucking weird for a debut album, man. Side note, I know that Ghostface Killah is on almost every record on Raekwon‘s debut album, but they still had previous Wu-Tang albums to introduce them, fam. In any case, not only is Hov prominently featured on the project, his voice is actually the first one we hear, folks. Frankly, all of this shit is strange, brethren.

Next, from a production aspect, Just Blaze is nowhere to be found on this album. Meaning, the mastermind behind “Exhibit A” and “Exhibit C” is not involved with the construction of this project. Furthermore, Jay Elec himself produces six out of the 10 songs. Now, his beats aren’t wack, but he could’ve gotten some harder shit to rock on, son. Like, he manages to recruit Swizz Beatz, Hit-Boy, AraabMuzik, The Alchemist and No I.D. for some tracks, but that only covers three of the songs, man. The truth is, the production is a little underwhelming, fam.

Now, to the matter at hand, bruh. *Sigh* For someone with Jay Elec’s lyrical ability, Hov cleans him up on pretty much every song. Shit, starting with “Ghost of Soulja Slim,” Hov isn’t playing with Jay Elec, son. I guess it’s a testament to his respect for Jay Elec’s pen, because Hov brings his A-game, man. Keeping it a buck, Hov’s verses on this album make me want another Jay-Z project, fam. Hell, him and No I.D. need to reconnect and do a follow-up to 4:44, people.

In the end, it might not seem like it from this post, but I actually like A Written Testimony, bruh. Real talk, a rapper of Jay Electronica’s caliber isn’t capable of making “wack” music, folks. Ultimately, after such a loooooong delay, I just wanted more, son. By and by, I wanted better beats and I wanted MORE Jay Elec. At the end of the day, he better not disappear again after this. In my eyes, he owes fans (like me) a lot more, man. *Sigh* Maybe next time we’ll actually get a Jay Electronica album, fam. Here’s to wishing, though. That is all. LC out.

Joe Budden Can Still Rap His A*s Off!

Ok, ok, ok, let’s get all of the common Joe Budden narratives out of the way, son. He’s irrelevant, he’s a one-hit wonder, he’s a crackhead and he’s a woman beater who only dates video models. Did I nail all of the social media digs against him? Ok, good. Now that I’ve gotten that out of the way, I must say, I’ve always been a Joe Budden fan. I know, I know, people think I’m in the minority here. However; if folks would get past the words of Twitter and Instagram trolls, they’d realize something easily noticeable: that man can rap his ass off. With that being said, his new album, Rage & The Machine, is exactly what I wanted to hear from this dude.

Now, when I say I’ve always been a Joe Budden fan, I should probably provide some context. I started peeping his skill back when he used to rhyme with Fabolous and Paul Cain on DJ Clue mixtapes. As a matter of fact, it was this particular freestyle that made me a fan. When homie said “I get around, like to travel, like to move my pivot,” I was sold, son. I mean, I’m an East Coast dude, man. We’re all about the punchlines, something that’s painfully missing from Rap right now. In any case, after hearing all of the freestyles, hearing “Focus,” and ultimately, “Pump It Up,” I had to buy his debut album. That’s right, I purchased his debut album, son. Big whoop, wanna fight about it? Moving on, on that album, I used to rock out a lot to “Pusha Man” and wax poetically with my bro Fabian about the virtues of “10 Mins.

So, before I bore everyone out there about my unceasing fandom, it’s safe to say, I’ve been there for the entire ride. I’ve been there for his shelved second album, The Growth. I’ve been there for the Mood Muzik mixtape series. I’ve been there for the Slaughterhouse lyrical exercises. Simply put, I’ve been there, man. However; as much as I enjoy the “emo” records he’s known for these days, he seemed to forget about being the punchline juggernaut he came into the game as. With that being said, Rage & The Machine came along at the right time. With araabMUZIK cooking up nothing but heat on production, the original Joey is back. Needless to say, I’ve been running this album back a lot since it came out on Friday. As of right now, my favorite track on the album is “Idols.” I mean, they flipped a Tevin Campbell sample, son. Tevin Campbell, bro… Exactly.

All in all, people can say whatever they want to, man. I have no problems with giving an artist their just due. While I can’t forgive Joe for his fuckery on Love & Hip Hop and have a few questions about his checkered history with women, I’m still a fan of his lyrics. At least that part of him is infallible, son. Good day.

P.S. Drake took a shot at Kid Cudi while he’s in rehab, but ain’t want no static with Joe. Sucker shit, son. I’m out.