‘The Photograph’: The Debate Over Michael & Mae

Disclaimer: I’m back with all of the spoilers, brethren. Proceed with caution.

So, over the weekend, my wife and I went to go see Stella Meghie’s The Photograph. In any case, despite the fact that the film doesn’t stray too far away from common romantic drama themes, I still enjoyed myself, son. Moving on, after we saw the movie, my wife came across a brief review by Demetria L. Lucas. All I can say is, I disagree with her assessment of the main characters’ relationship.

Ok, before I continue, let me give a quick synopsis of the plot. So, the film revolves around Michael Block and Mae Morton. Anyway, Michael is a writer for an online magazine and Mae is a curator at a museum. Now, they end up crossing paths because Michael is writing a piece on Christina Eames, a famous photographer who also happens to be Mae’s mother. The truth is, I could delve into the entire storyline, but I’m trying to get to the source of the conflict between Michael and Mae.

Now, in the midst of getting to know each other, Michael finds out that he secured a writing job with the Associated Press in London, England. From there, Michael expresses to Mae that he still wants to pursue a relationship with her, despite her New York living situation. Hurt by the news, Mae rejects Michael’s wish to continue and chooses to just enjoy their final moments together.

With all of that being said, let’s get back to Lucas’ point. Now, in her Instagram post, she expressed disappointment with the fact that Mae goes to see Michael in London (for a Kendrick Lamar concert). In her eyes, Michael should be the one to make a move for Mae. But, the last time I checked, Mae says that she doesn’t want to pursue anything further with Michael. Frankly, when Michael gets on the plane to London, he’s under the assumption that Mae doesn’t want him. So, why would he continue to chase her down?

Look, I’m old enough to have had a few laps around the block, man. On the real, I’ve heard multiple women complain about men who “didn’t get the hint.” Also, I’ve heard women lament about guys who “wouldn’t leave [them] alone” or kept “badgering [them].” The fact is, Michael is simply respecting Mae’s wishes. Now, if Mae has a change of heart, which she ultimately does, then it is on her to communicate this. Fam, we’re all adults here. If Mae wants Michael, then she should tell him that, which is what brings her to England. All in all, I believe this situation happens exactly the way that it should, bruh.

Anyway, while I’m here, I want to address some of the caping that I saw for Christina in Lucas’ comments. Son, a few of these ladies need to stop justifying her behavior. Shit, I saw one comment where a woman said that people keep talking about Christina’s “perceived failures” instead of her accolades. Perceived? Fam, Christina gets on a Greyhound bus, without telling her partner Issac Jefferson, while pregnant with his child and doesn’t tell him (or Mae) that Mae is his for the next 30 years. Furthermore, Christina doesn’t tell her daughter that she’s sick and ends up writing all of her feelings in a letter. Keep in mind, Christina never shares any of these observations with Mae during her life.

All I know is, Christina’s accomplishments don’t negate the fact that she treats people terribly. Look, she has every right to not want to live a “mediocre” life with Issac in Louisiana. Hell, she would’ve ended up resenting him if she stayed. However, she’s still in a union with Issac. As a grown-up, she’s obligated to tell him that she’s planning to leave. She’s obligated to tell him that he has a child. Son, she essentially left Mae with the responsibility of repairing the relationship with Issac. Keeping it a buck, those aren’t “perceived failures.” Those are glaring character flaws, man.

In the end, I’m not here to bash anyone, fam. Ultimately, I just always find it interesting how factions of people can look at the same situation in drastically different ways. By and by, I thought the movie was good, bruh. At the end of the day, I think I can add it to my “rewatch-ables” list. So, great job, Meghie. Great job. That is all. LC out.

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